The Creative Personality – Smart/Naive Paradox

Hello Internet Universe,

Today’s “Creative Personality” is on how we, as creative individuals, ensure the fact that as a whole being is a paradox. Science has even tested our minds and our IQs to show that we are a paradox, according to Psychology Today’s website. We can have our brains measured with our Convergent knowledge and we’re actually relatively smart. We also show another side of things with also Divergent thinking, meaning more situational thinking. And we can do both simultaneously.

Back in 1921, psychologist Lewis Terman tested the brains of people compared to their creativity and noticed something profound. Those who scored higher than 120 on the test were going to succeed but after a certain IQ point there wasn’t any added value to us. And those below 120, weren’t creative enough to be able to come up with and do the things we do. This doesn’t make us proud, it is a proven fact.

We also have the tendency to be able to use our emotional and mental smarts to be able to come up with the deepest insights into our workings. We contribute an emotional response when seeing art, and as a creative writer or a painter, or anything artistic, our job is to bring out the emotional responses to get people to stop and think about things. Our ability to do that also rests on our mental smarts as well because we need to have the ability to put everything we’re thinking into words that make sense.

None of this matters, however, if we didn’t have a quantity of ideas. We could have a plethora of ideas and only a few be real “money-makers”, and we need to have the flexibility to see both. As creative thinkers, we do have the flexibility to see what would be a good idea or at least elaborate on the not so great of them. Our flexibility also helps with our ability to switch perspectives. We have to when we write because we’re not writing ourselves (not always anyway because there’s always going to be a portion of us in our characters) so we need to see things how someone else would see them; if we didn’t write from different perspectives, our characters wouldn’t be believable.

My final note is that we have a high “g factor” (general intelligence) to be able to make us who we are, whether we’re a paradox or a mix. We need to be ourselves, because if we’re not, we will be unfulfilled in our lives and become unhappy. It’s best we just take a look at ourselves in the mirror and say, “I’m a Paradox.” We need to admit it to ourselves and flaunt it for what it’s worth. If we don’t take ourselves seriously, who will?

Accept yourself,

Allya